Everyone stay calm but NYC is going to possibly maybe blow up I think kind of

So you probably all heard the news that there has been some “credible” but “unconfirmed” reports of the possibility that car bombs will explode in New York City in the next couple of days.  Specifically, the New York Times reported, “A White House official said on Thursday evening that while the government has already stepped up its vigilance in advance of the anniversary, ‘the president directed the counterterrorism community to redouble its efforts in response to this credible but unconfirmed information.’

What does this really mean when you cut through the hyperbole and government talk?  According to Vice President Biden, the threat is “credible,” because there are “specifics”, i.e., “car bombs” were described during what I assume was an intercepted or series of intercepted conversations.  The information in the intercepted conversations was not “confirmed,” according to Biden however, because there is no other evidence — read: not even a scintilla of evidence — that corroborates the intercepted statements that “car bombs” would be used.

In fact, what is telling is that the CIA or the NSA or the DEA or whoever else was doing wiretapping has not even suggested or intimated who they were wiretapping.  I assume the target or targets the three letter acronym agencies were wiretapping weren’t high value or even medium value or even low value. Because, let’s assume this: they were wiretapping a suspected terrorist or it came across an intercepted conversation of an unknown person talking to a suspected terrorist or an associate of a suspected terrorist, then the suggestion could at least be articulated that the intercepted conversations describing the “car bomb” threat are not completely “unconfirmed.”

For all we know, the three letter agencies wiretapped a sheep farmer who said, “Hey, did you hear from Ibrahim that he heard from Muhammed that he believes Al Queda might use car bombs on around Sept 11 in New York City?”

Under the definition and standards given by our government, this would be a “credible” but “unconfirmed” threat.

I think it’s fair to say that I don’t want to get blown up or seen anyone  blown up by a damn car bomb.  But I don’t know what or who the hell these announcements serve, other than to do one or all of the following: raise fear, breed apathy, increase overtime for law enforcement, or provide legitimacy to Homeland Security and other government agencies.  They are not much different than the color threat rating levels.

These announcements provide us with absolutely no information and in my opinion, make us less vigilant, not more.

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Post Raisin Bran: Haters of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran

The first raisin bran introduced in the United States was called Skinner’s Raisin Bran, in 1926.  It was made by the same company, U.S. Mills, that made Uncle Sam’s Cereal.  You can still buy Uncle Sam’s Cereal, but I find that cardboard with honey tastes much better.

Nowadays, when most people think of Raisin Bran, they are thinking of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran.   You know, the one with the “two scoops.”  Not surprisingly, Kellogg’s raisin bran is the most popular raisin bran in the United States, regardless of whether the flakes are small, the raisins are dried out, and it’s loaded with sugar, I mean, high-fructose corn syrup.  Enter “raisin bran” in google, and Kellogg’s Raisin Bran will be the first listing that pops up.

Post Raisin Bran, on the other hand, has bigger flakes and the raisins are a lot fluffier.  In their mind, and rightfully so, they feel they should have a larger share of the raisin bran market.  They’re better than Total Raisin Bran or some of the other knock offs or late comers to the Raisin Bran Wars.

So what does Post Raisin Bran do?  They make their cereal box eerily similar to the Kellogg’s Raisin Bran Box.  Same purple themed tone.  And, as you can see in the picture below, they even put Kellogg’s — in the same distinctive “Kellog’s” font no less — front and center on the box, right above a smaller label for “Post.”  If you were to look at this quickly, you would think, “Oh, it’s a Kellog’s Post Raisin Bran Cereal.”

Seems to me that this looks a lot like false advertising.  Decide for yourself.

 

Post Raisin Bran: Notice the purple themed box and the "Kellogs" right above the "Post."

 

 

Kellogg's Raisin Bran: It tastes worse than Post, but it's the original